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手机上捕鱼2020年05月26日14时21分35秒

时间:2020-05-26 14:21:36 作者:中华军事 浏览量:10299

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】经典老歌 U1nQdJ8O\The sout\h-west Africa】n /country of An/gola is wakin】g up to /its\ tour/ism potenti/al, offering opportunitie/s for vi【sitor【\s and /in【vestor\s a【lik【e./One of the】 most unspo\ilt regions\ is th】e Namibe deser/t, wh/ich/\ stretches 2,000 kil【ometr】es acr【o\ss t】hree countri【es.T【he dese\rt runs all 】the way from t/he/ Iona Nation\al Park in A】\ngola, t】hrough/【 Namib【【ia, to South Af\ric\a&r】squo;s 】Kalahari Desert - more 【than 80,000】 square kilometres. You \can\ drive for hour/s along the Corridor of the Tides, where the desert meets the ocean.N】a/m\ib】e mean】s ‘’vast pla\ce’&rsquo【;\ in the local la\ng/uage and it lives up【 to its name &/nd【ash; a tourism wonderl【and with a s\p\ect】acula\r coastlin【e.A\ndrea\ Mar【tins【【 runs an eco-touris】m lodge perched abo【ve a 】grotto on the Atlantic Oc】ean. Praia do \Soba, meaning &lsqu\o;Beach of the Chief’, offe【/rs mag【/nificent view【s of sandstone \cliff/s c】/arve\d by na【ture.【Mar】ti【ns says】 the locatio【n was dis/cov\ered by her f\ather and\ the【 family/ decided to inv】est there.She comp】/a\r/es her adventuro/us fat\her to the movie character Crocodile Dundee.“This wa\s the\ l】a】/st lost paradise of】 Angola】, beca】use no one fo/und this 【plac【e, becau\s【e there was】\ no road, /no/ access, and my Crocodile 【Dundee, m【y father, the/ Ango】lan Crocod/ile Du】】ndee, arr\ived here, he m【ade】 a road, an】d he found this amazi】ng place.&rdq】uo/;The ind】i】vidual hut【s are //beautif【ully decorated, and there are plans to build more. The/re are also plans to provide luxury campsites for so-cal】led glam/ping tourism.Marti【ns tol【d Business Angola: “W\e 】want t/o make a bigger r】e/staurant, a conference room,/ more rooms and we want to (【do) glamping, to have【 al【l kinds of people here.&rd\/quo;Martin Bremer, a S/out/h African businessman, already ru】】/ns】 a g】lamping compa【【ny, giving tourists 【a/ chance to t【ravel dee【【p into the heart of Nami】be\ pro/vi【nce.Bremer\ has travelle】d extensiv】ely th【rough southern Africa as part\ of his stone business.&】ldq/uo;We visited all sorts of &l【squo\;off the beaten track’ (places), a】ll the uncha\rted sites. And i】t was just a\ n/a\/tural thi\ng to do to bring p【eople into this area./”Bremer/ says co【mp\ared to /other countri【es in southe/rn Africa, An【gola is ripe for investm】ent in tourism.&l【dquo;It【's op】e\n, 】it's becoming much easier to for【m partnerships. They】've changed m\any of the la\【ws to make it ea【sier for /people t\o invest. There ar/e great c【ompan/ies in Angola.”It&rsquo/\;s hope/d【 a/ 500 mi【l/l【ion-euro expansion of the southe\rn port of Namibe\ w】ill have flow-on eff【/ects for t/ourism a】nd \leisure.Japanese company Toyota is be【hi\nd the investment, wh\ich will 】doub\le the size /of the】【 po】rt, connect\ed to the region by rail, while adding tou\rism and lei/sure facilities.Nuno Borges da Silva, \Chairman of \Toyo\ta Angola, told Business An【gol\a: “The port will /be a big support fo【r tourism/ ves【se\ls】, because】【 now they 】don't hav】e conditions/ to 【bring vessels and tour【i【sts. But w/hen this p【ort【 is ready it wil/l be very beautif/ul, and y/ou can al\so d【oc】k b】ig vessels.&r】【dq】/uo;【He said for【eigners can invest \in An\gola without any local/ partners.&ld【quo;Let'】s say it's more open to the peop【le to come and \invest w【ithout any difficulty, a\ny problem,【” he said.【Sha【re this articleC【/opy/pas\te the/ article video embed link be/low:CopyShareTweetShar\esendShareTweetSharesendMor【e【Hide\Share【SendS【】hareShar/eShareSen】\dSh【/a】reSh\ar\e【More aboutTouri/smFauna and】 Fl/oraEnvironment\al prot】ectionAn\golaAfrica Bro【wse today�】【;s /t【ag】smxgc

7BAyGra/pe skin leather\ is one of the】/ alternativ/es. \asU7

aJ1aB【y Lasse /GustavssonThe rich ge【t richer while the p/o/or get poo/rer, and fis】h have no voice or vot【e. This fishy business 】has to【/ sto】\p. Govern【ments cann\ot def\end private in\te】rests an/d perpetuate ine/】quality and】 】mismanagement of/ n】atura【l pub\lic resource at【 the expens【e 【of the en\】vironment, /\small-sca【l\e fishermen,】 coast【al/ communities and the 】wi/der /e\conom/y.】 / Lasse 【】Gustavsson\ Executive Director at Oceana 【 "W/e have /n/ot come here to beg the【 world leaders to care for our future. T】hey h【ave ignore\d u【\s \in the past and th\ey will ig【nore us agai【n. We ha【ve c\o/【me he】re to let them know that change【 is comin/g whethe\r 【they like it/ or not./" Those words were spoken /by a fifteen year o/l【d Swedis【\h】 climate activist Greta T/hunberg, addres\sing】 the partic/ipants of the UN co】n【ference \COP24 i】n Katowice【, Poland】. A child/ points【 \to politicians s】aying that the em/peror has no cl【othes. Bu【t they show no shame o【r】 emba\rrassmen】t/ and keep leading/ us /】astray. The world 【is on fire. We live in times of unprecedented envi】ronmental crisis, the【 “Anthropocene&rdqu【o; ep】oc\h, where h/uman】i/t】y’s destructive impact i\s undeniab【le. H\umans /e【xcessively b/\urn fossil //fuels,\ cause deforest//at【ion, de【struction of ecosystems\, loss of biodiversity and s【pe/c】ies 】extinct】ion. We ha】ve p\o【lluted our【 o/ceans /with\ plastics and\ overexp【loi【ted their【 natural abun\da【nce.【Climate【 change i/s a global challe【ng【e and one of the biggest threa】ts to humanit\【y. COP24 is likely\ to 【fail d】ue to a lack of politic\al will to act and shocking sho】rt-term 【ex\pedience; the road t/o mea/n】ingful cha\nge is very long and bu/mpy. However, there is 】hope in】 【other quick\-/win decision】s to be tak【en which directly impact 【the envi\ron\ment and can b】rin\g immediate results.One such/ opportunity is the A\griculture and 】Fisheries Council taking【 place on】/ 17-18 De【cember in Brussels. European fishe\ries minis/ters will 】decide on annual catch quot/as for the Atl\antic /and Nort】h Sea; \t】hat【 is to say, how mu/ch f/ish ca/n be saf/ely ta/ken out of/ sea wi/thout compromising th\e st】o【ck&/r\squo;s recovery cyc/l【e.\ Fish is the perfect protei】n and \if pr【operly managed, can be a self-ren】ewing natural source of food which \contributes t/o our eco/nom/i/es.E\U l\aw req\uires that management be ba/sed /on scien【ce&m\das【h;biologic/al models assess t】he condition 】of stocks and advise on next year&rsq/uo;s 【catch limits.】 However, the reality is diff\erent due to petty politics. December’s Council is /an earl】y Christmas gi【ft//\ for usually /lo】w-key fi/she【ries mi/nisters and /an opportunity for/ them to shine【 in the media 】and boast】\ 】abou/t how much fish they n\egotiated in Br\】ussels. 【They pa/y lip service to sustai】nabili\ty while the deals they re】ach in t\his annua\l【 h】orse-t【rading】 ritual often overshoot scientific advice a/s】 t【hey co】ntinue to set catch limits too high.Thi\s C】ouncil is special; it is 【the/ last\ on】e for【 En\v】iron】ment an\d 】Fishe/rie/s /Commissio【ner Karmenu Vel/la, who\se term is comi】ng to an \end.】 The decision made will be h/is swan【 song and a last 【/ch/ance to lead the reluc\tant member states back on track with their own legally-binding com\mitment/【】s. C【ommissioner Ve/lla’】s heritage is less flamboya【nt than th/at of his predecess【or, Maria Damanki, who initiated t【he Common Fisherie】s Policy’s reform (【CFP) whi/ch\ resu【lted in】 a】n ambitiou】s EU law with a clear objective: to stop ov/erfish】ing by 2020\.Vel/l/\a’s job was the techni【cal implementation the【reof./ Re\c\overy of the iconic blue\fi】n t【una, hailed as a s\uccess sto】/ry】【, wa\s recently marred【 by 【scandal and a Europo【l criminal investig\ation in Malta, Spain an\d】 /Italy, 】resulting\ in 【t\he sei\zure of over 80 tons of illegal fish 】wor\th over &euro\;12 mi】llion and\ th】e arrest of 76/ people. \The Mediterranean Sea 【is in crisis, with an【 o】verf】【ishing ra/te of over 90% of\ 】a】ssessed stocks. Ho/wever, Atlant/ic and North Sea EU fish】eries - overexploited by 40% - s\till 】stand a chance to del【【iver by the\ leg\al deadline o/f 2020.T【here】 has never/ /bee\n \a bet【te】r】 moment to【 switch to fully sustain】able】 fisher【ies. EU fleets/ alr\eady make record/ high net pr/ofits compared to\ oth【【er ind/ustrie/s due to low f】uel price】s and improved produ【ctivity of/ cert\ain stocks. Th【e/y can afford/ a short-term, necess/ary】 reduction in【 quotas for the sake of longer-term gains. Healthy fisheries yield \impressive returns\, and\ sustainabilit//y p/rovides long te\rm pr\ofitability.In 【contrast, overfis\hing is against common sense, the \law, t/he e【nvironment and the ec\ono】my; it costs us jobs, food, and/\ 】m【one】y. 】O/ceana&【rsquo】;s】 ex【tensive research and country case stud【ies ha/ve s【howed【 how sustainable fishing/ /based on science can further con/tr】ibute to the EU economy:】 60% mo\re fish landings 】(2 m】illion to/\nn/es), EU GDP inc\rease of &e】/uro;4.9 billion, 】and 92,000 new jo\bs【. Thos/e are enor/mous social\-econom/ic 【gains w】hich are har/d to ignore.And yet fisheries minist【ers are dea】f t\o this st/rong argument. Their irration】al behav】iou\r can on/ly be explained by 【a lack of coura【ge, sh】\ort-term think/ing an/d catering to【 particular fisheries lobbies. Recent scandals in the /UK【 and \Denma\/rk \conf】irm 【tha【t 】“codf/athers&r【d】quo; h/a\ve 】mor\e in【fl/ue【nce than scientist】s o【n ministers\, who a\/ct like the proverbial fox guardin【g】 the henhouse.It is no coincidence 【that the worst offenders in terms\】 of bein\g cham/pions of overfishing /are the\ fisher\ie【s min\isters as \th【ey ignore scientific advice and/ cosy up to \the fi/【shing companies. Five wealthy UK families c【oncentrate power over more than a quarter of the country&rsquo【;s】 【【fishing quota, disc/rim【inati/ng against smaller-sca【le fi\shermen./ Simil/\a【rly in Denmark - where the fisheries 【minister was fo/rced to leave his job du【e to his 】coddling of the industry&rsquo/;s “/big fish” - the lion’s share 【of catches still remain i【n【 the han【/ds of a/ fe【w &ldq】uo;qu\o】ta\ \kings&r\dquo/\;.】The rich get richer w/\hile the \poor get poo/rer, and fish have no voice\ or vo】te. 【This fishy b\usine\ss【 has to s】top. Governments\ c/annot defend priv/ate interests and perpetuate \/inequal】ity and \mismanag/em\ent of\】 natural publ/ic reso【u\rce at the e】xpense 】\of the enviro/nmen\t【, small-sca/le fishermen, 】\coasta】l co【mmu/nities and the【 wi/der economy.NGOs and soc【iety will not beg nat【ional m/ini\s【te】rs and EU insti【tutions to c】【are for our【 planet, sustainabili/ty of our/\ natural resources, and our com\【m\on fu】\ture - it \is t\heir res】】p】onsibility. Ch/an【ge will com/e\/ eventually/, and po/l【iticians will be the【 firs\t on/】es to go. Liv】e up to y/our respons】ibilites and do the righ/\t 】thin【g: you are not onl【y po/liticians but also decision-takers and lawmake】rs. Your horizo【n\ should be the】 【good o/f future gener【a【\tions, not t/he 【next el】ection and the private【 sector’s favours. You have the/ power t【o #【/StopOverfishing.\ Bring back our /fish\ 【now!【L/asse G】ustavsson is the】 Executive Direc【tor /of Oceana in EuropeOpinio/ns【 expressed in Vie\w 【art/icles ar\e so\lely thos【e of the author.Sha/re this articleShareTweetSharese\ndShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS\hareSe/ndShare】Share\【Share/SendShareShareYo/u might/ also like / Scallo/p【】 wars: French and】 Bri/tish fi\shermen pledge talks to solve spat 【 】 \ 【 / Senegal's fishermen say /】European overfishi】ng is】 crippling 】them / 】 / / / 】Coronavirus latest: Donald Trump halts /US paymen】t【s to World Healt/h \Organi【zation / 】 More aboutEurop】ean \UnionEuropean po【l\iticsOpinionfis/hingfish industryEnvironmental protection 【 Br】owse 】today&#【039;【s tags161zvelp

5zf9“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207It【】 sits o\ff the coast of Nor】mandy,【 l【ooking like 】a f\airytale castle flo/ating on】 the water.】But for years, the Mont/ Saint Michel ha】s lost a part of its \mysterious solitude【, due t\o an accumulation of /】silt at the island's base.The concret】e causeway\ that conn\ected the island to the ma【inla】\nd pre\/v/ented the wa\te\】r /from flowly /fre】ely aro【und its base.But, no】w 】the sit】e ha\s begun to reclaim its island-like appearance during cert/a【in high tides.\Research on the proje】c\t start\ed in 1995, an【d continued /for more than/ 10 years.】 It then took another 10 year/s to complete th\e majo/r structural/ changes.\【Mar\ie-Agnés Po\ussi/er-Winsb/ack/, Vice-Presi/dent \of Normandy Regional【 【【Council【, said: "【T/hes\e works had【 two aims. First【ly【, to make sure 】that the island/ /coul/d, once a】gain, b\e what it 【wa【s duri】ng previous 【centuries, that is, surro【】unded by the sea and not s\an【d and silt. And second】ly, 【to\ improve\ the】 way we /ma/nage touri【sm."The \main work undertak】en w】as the remov\al of the\ concr/ete causeway. I/t】 was replaced/ with a brid】ge on stilts, the/refore allowi\ng water【 】to trav【el un】derneath it. It conn\ects to an area of solid gr【/ound that becomes sub/mer\g\ed dur/ing high \tide.Th\e o//ld dam o\n the Co【u/e【snon【 w/\as al【so 【d\emol】i\s【hed, and replaced wi\th /a\ new eig/h【t-gated structure that reg【ulates the 【flow between 】the river 】and the sea, which meet in t/h】e ba/y】.Romai】n D/esgu&e】acute;e, who【】 manages the ne】w d【am, explained to E\urone/ws how it works】."The 】old dam was th\ere to limit floodi\ng 】and mar/ine \flooding. The n】ew dam obvi/ously continues to do so, bu】】t it will regen【erate t/he hydro\logi\cal curren\t in the r【iver to erode the sediment. This will【 rem【ove \the sand t【hat accumulated at the 】base of Mont S】aint M】ichel," \he said.To complete th】is facelift, the car parks at t【he/ foot of the island【 h\ave been\ remo/ved, and it can no/w only be reached by a】 free shuttle bus, horse-drawn/ c【ar【riage, or by foot.More t】han 2.5/ m】illion tourists visit the World He/ritage Site every year, but the】 new 【c【hanges m/【e】an that tou【】r】 guid】es【 have had to adap\t.H【ug】o Poulet, a /gu【ide /】【for Les C】he\min\s de la】 Baie, vis\its the bay【 several 【times a da\y with groups of tourists. He /said that \the structural ch\anges have ha/】】d\ an e【ffect on his wor【k."Since the w\orks hav】e finishe【d, the ground leve】l has drop【ped, 【the sea is moving【 faste\r and no\w 【we \have 】the Cu\esnon pa【ss【ing on 】e/a/\ch side. \We do shorter outing【s, we adapt to\ th【e sea and we manage to 】juggle】\ tha】t,"【 he 【said.The project cost a total of /&【euro;184 mi【llion. Of th】at, €85 million was funded by the Fre\nch government, and €21.5 million was financed by the EU's cohesi】on 【pol/icy,】 w\hich took charge of part of the co/nst\ruction of the dam and its hydraulics.1212121212121212Share this articleCopy/past\e the article video embed l\ink below:CopyShareTweetShare\sendShareTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareSendShareSh/areMore aboutMont-Saint-MichelEnvironmen/tal protectionTou】rismFrance【 \ 【 \Browse today/9;s tags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsiDxv

a3x8The European Union he/ld its fir【st post-B/rexit/【 summit h\alf【 a\ year before Br】//exit.And in\ orde】【r【 to 【get ev【erybody used \to\ it, The】resa May was 【absent.Which】 ma【de sense, as】 th\e meeting informally d/iscuss\ed what 【Europe's fut【ure 】priorities should look like.Nobody wanted h【er to be part of that c【onversa\【tio【\】n, and/ t【he B\ritish\ Pr】ime Minis/ter 【w\as /probably relieved not to h/ave to contribute to 】t/hat brain【s\torm\/ing.London might also hav/e been uncomfort【/able wit/h the venue: the 】city of Sib】iu in T/rans【ylvania】 where D\racula came from, especially with t/he /next Bre【xit】 deadline falling on H\alloween.T\he EU leaders /ag\reed o】n【\】 ten points regardin/】g the fut/ure o/f Europe.Cli/mate change featured only tenth as a/ prio/rity &n/dash;】 a fact that was \immediately critic【ized /by the E【uropean Gre【en】s, not present i】n S\ibiu.They called\】 it an insu\lt to th\e young people who have bee/n vo\icing\ their 【concerns about climate chan\ge for mont\hs.Yet not everything 【is【 gl/oomy when it /】/come t/\o\ environmental politics in Europe.The day before the summit,/ eight membe/r states 【【present【ed a plan to【 cut CO2 【emissions 【t【o net zero/ by 2050.Notably】 absent was a countr】y that cut emissions twice as muc【h/ a】s the EU average last ye【ar –\ Germany.Wher\eas E】urope was trying t\o tackle climate change politically,】 the world was dist】【racted by another crisis.One that could e【asily 】【】intensify in the months ahead【.I'm talking abou【t】 /the Iran nu\clear deal which seems to on the verge of collapsing/ after Teh/r【an a\nno【unced】 t】hat it plans to cease some co\mmitments.Yet【 the one behind/ the slow death of the agree】ment is Donald Trump.He walk【ed away from【 it last yea【r, showcasing hi\s dis\dain for diplomacy and what once was a huge multilateral br【eakthrough.Next weekOn Monday, Hungarian Prime Mini】ster Viktor Orba】n will meet US Pres\id【ent Donald T】rump【 at the White 【H/ouse.The meeting will pair t【wo populist/ leaders/ who want 【to restrict migrati/【on, /have vilified jou\rnalis\】】ts and fostered 】tensions with th\e E/uropean Union.On Tue\sday, Rus【si【an Fo】reign Minister 】Sergej 】L\avro【v hosts his US counterpart M\i/ke P【ompeo in Sotchi.Their 】talks will fo【cus /on finding 【a solu\tion to the escalating crisis/ in Venezuela.And on W\ednesday, the candidates f/or the presid\ency of \the E\U Com/miss【i【on wi】l【l 】deb/ate i//n the \European Parliament 】in【 Brus/sels.This debate will be t/he onl/y【 one t】o b】ring together all\ the lead /candid【ates vying to be 】the su【ccess【or of Jean-Claude J\u【ncke/r.Last WordThis time i】t goes to\ /Jean-Claude Juncker./】 T\】he EU Commission President, at/ a press conference, w【ho tal【ked\ ab/out hi【s bigg/est m【【istakes in office."The sec/o/nd mist/ake I made was】 to listen too car/efully/ to t【he Br【itish government, Ca\mer】on, because t【h【e then-Pri】me Minister asked me not to interfere, n\ot to intervene in t/he refe【rendum campaign.It was a mistake not to intervene an\d 】n】ot to interfere becaus\e we would hav\e been the onl】y ones to \destroy 【th】e lies, which \were ci【rculated aroun】d. \I was wr/ong to be silent a【t an important moment."Share th】is art\icleCopy/paste th】e a【rticle \video/ 【embe\/d link below:CopyShareTweet【SharesendSh\areTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areS/ha】reSh\areSendShareShareYou/ mi/ght also like 】 \ / 】 Five stories you may h】ave /\missed /\due to\ coronav【irus 】【 【 】【 】 \ 】 【 EU 【leaders【 m】e\et v【i【a video-conferenc/e - so do our c】orres/ponden】【ts / 【 】 \ / Brexi【t: U/K 'w\【【ill not seek tra//de talks ex\tension&\#039; despite Barnier【 having CO\VID-19【 More aboutEU SummitBre\xitJean-Claude Ju【nckerEnvironmental protection \ 】 【 【Brow\se today【9;s /tagsfXWg

qQDqIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsAeqb

Easy【Jet unveils plans to become world&】#0//9;s first carb/on-】neutr】al airline

BH0WBusi\ness Pla【\net hea】ds to L/atvia to see how the 】cou】ntry's biggest h\ousehold chemical and cosmet】i】cs maker is profiting t\hanks【 to it】s eco-minded\ strategy.Ch\emical\s are e【ssenti】al to our daily lives, bu【t some can pose a risk to human health and the environ【ment\. Europe'\s chemica\l le】gislat\ion known \as】 RE\A【CH place/s a hi】gh responsibil/i】ty fo】r chemical management on industry. For small firms using subs【tances and mi\xtures/【 in/ th【eir productio/n, deal\in/g with such strict requir】ement【s ca/n be tough. In this episode, the Business Planet team 【/look at what the Europea】n Unio/n is doing to help 【S【MEs cope with their legal responsibilities.】Good chemistryWhen 】】an enterprise makes a conc】ert】ed effort to【【 reduce it】s envir\on【menta/l impact, that is bette\【r【 for the planet, but it can al\so be good for busines/s. JSC Spodr【i】\ba is one 】【such compa\ny. Based in the city of Dobele, /in t\he heart of\ the /co】u\ntry, the firm is L】atvia’s largest producer of household chemicals, mak\】ing a host of cle\/aning and con\sumer goods【 for t【h【e home.xSince 2012, the co【mpany has wo\rked on de【velopin【g m【ore ecologi【cally】 friendly\ 】products\,\ like its Seal b\rand range. JSC Spodriba's Dire【ctor Baiba Megre, insi】sts this was a deliberate strategic move."...it w/as t\he compan/y’】s/\ choic】e and it fitted ver】y well wi\th the company&r/squ/o】;s values【 and philos/ophy,/ for a greener f】u\ture 】for [the] n】ext generat】ion. And we saw the [trend] in the Nor【di】c【【 market as well,】 tha【t 【it i/s alr【eady ha/ppening there, and /we decided to go for it, and we are really h\app【y we d【id it."Re\aping the reward】s\That move to produce more e/nvironmen】【tally frien】dl】y pro【ducts ha【s paid off. Th】e \firm’s】 eco-range】 【now repre\sent】s nearly 25 per cent of total turnover.\ But JSC Spo】driba \is not restin】g on its laurels】. The compa】ny has recently obtai】ned ne【w e/quip/me】nt \to develop even greener household product/s through an E/U funded /project called LIFE/Fit for REACH.Coordinated by the Balti【c Environmen/tal Fo【r【u\m Latvia, t】he proj】ect is designed\ to he//lp firms in the Baltic】 re\gion comply\ with Europe&\rsquo;s str/inge/nt】 chemi【cal rules."This n/ew equipment 【is really【 important for us," explain【s Baiba Megre, adding: "We will be a\ble to incr】】e】ase/】 our turnover, a【s we are loo\kin】g to other export mar/kets and it w【ill【 help us in f\uture t/o/ be 【more i\nnovative in】 \product development. W【e can 】】【make our recipes much f【aster, t】hat 】means w【\e/ wi【ll【 be more competitive【 in the market in /t】he fu【ture."】/The【 LIFE/Fit for R】EACH project is just one【 of several EU ini】tiatives \aimed at/\ helping SM【Es meet their/ obligations 】under \the REACH legal framework.【 Business Planet spo】ke to A\gnese Meija-Toropo\va, from the Baltic Environmental F】orum Latvia.Pau【l Hackett, Bu】siness P【lanet: "Agnese...what kind of suppo【rt are you offer】ing companies?"Agne\se Meija-/Toropova, Balti】c Environmental /Forum Latvi】a: "We are/ off/】erin\g v【/arious type【s/ of\ assistance t】o 】co\mpanie【s, fro【m cons【ultation to small\ scal【e financial aid."Pau【l Hackett, Bu/sine【ss P/lanet: "A】nd how is this changing things for the better?"Agne】se Mei/ja-Torop【ova, Baltic E/nvironm/enta】l Fo/【rum Latvi\a: "We have supported changes in cleane\r techno】logies in ov\er】/ /50 companies in all /t/h\ree Ba【/l】/tic stat\es, all of/ which have 【cl\ear and measurable results, or impacts on t【he environment."Agnese Meij\a-Toropova is from th\e B/a】ltic E】nvironmenta\l Forum Latvia. Busine/ss Planet spoke/ to he【r 【about how 【the LIFE/Fit f/or REACH【 project i\s s/eeking to help SMEs in the【 Baltic re【gion f【ollow bes】t practice wh】en\ it comes to chemical manage\men】t\.What is th\e【 LIFE/Fit f/or】 REACH project?"LI\FE/Fi【t for REACH is an in/terna】tio【n/al pro/ject co-f】inanced by the European Uni\o/n's LIFE programme a【i【ming to assi/\st SMEs in the Baltic sta】te【s to i【mplement best practices in the manageme\nt of hazardous chemicals, especially 】regarding the re\qu\irements of th【e REACH regu/lations."How is t【his/ impro/【ving the environment acr【\oss the /Balt/ic regio【n?"All the 】pilot ca/ses that a】re su\pported【 by the \project 【hav【e had measur/a\bl【e impacts, either in the reduction of use, or emissi【ons of certain haza/rdous substances, especia/lly focusing on】 【those 】which a【re 】hazard\ous to【】 the】 environment."EU chemic【/al re【gulations place a high on/us on industry, w】ho【 can com/p】a】n/ies or entrepreneur【s turn to \in orde】r /to make su\re the】y are complyi\ng wit/h t\he【se/ regula】t/ions?"I would say that first /and foremost the national regions CLP】 help desks /that】 are t【rained by the European Chemicals 】】Agenc【y to answer qu\estion/s from industry, regarding c】orrect chemical \managem】ent a】n】d implementa】tion o/f l/egal acts."\Usefu/l factsREACH 】is the Europ/ean Regu【【lation on Registration, Evaluation, A\ut【horisation【 and Restr\iction/ of Chemicals. It entered 】into for\ce in 2007, r\epl/acing the former l【egislati/v】e f/ramework fo】r 【chemicals in the\ EU.The \REAC\H regulations a】im】 to /ensure【 a high \/leve【l】 of protection o/f human health and the environment, 【promote al\/】ternative testing met】ho\ds, and ensure t】h\e/ free \c/irculation of goods【 in th】e EU, 】wh/ile enhancing co/mpetitiveness and innovation.REA【CH shif【ts the resp【onsibility from publi【c aut【horities to indust\/r【y with reg/】ards to assessing and managing \t/h】e risks pose\d by chem【】\icals 】and provi/ding appropriat】e safe【ty info】rmat】ion.RE【ACH and other pieces of EU \】chemic/als regulation have been\ d/\es\】i/gned to provide incentives for industry【 to try to replace hazardous substances wi【th】 le】ss ha\zardous ones. Successf】ul substitution can/ bring substantial benefi】ts to the compa】nies, the/ environment【 and the health of workers and consume\rs. It can a/lso have a significant pos【itiv/e im】pac/t on the imple/mentation 】o\f a circ】ular economy.LIFE/Fit for REACH】 /is a projec/t co\-fi】n】anced by t【he EU L【IFE【 Programme, EU’s f【/unding instrument for en【【viro【nment and climate【 action. The p】ro】j【ect aims \to supp】ort SMEs in the Baltic /region (Estonia【,\ Latv\ia, Lith/uania) transi/t\ion to \so/und】\ chemicals/ manageme【nt, especially w】hen \】it c】omes to helpi】ng them subst】itute hazard/o【us substances w】ith safer alternatives.Useful linksLIFE/Fit fo】r REA\CH【E】uropean Commission\ &nd\ash; REAC/\H Regul\ationEu】ropean】 Chemical\s \Agency (EC/HA)】 – Unders/ta】nding REACH\European/】 】Chemicals Agency (ECHA) – Substitution to safer che/m】ical【sLife 【pr\ogramme121212/1212Sh/are this articleCopy/paste th】e article/ video embed link be\low:C【op/ySh\a【reTweet/SharesendSh/ar【eTw】e】etSharesendMoreHi\deShareSendShar\eSh/areShareS\endShareShareM【ore about】BusinessEnvironmental【 protec【tion\ChemicalsLatvi\a Browse today】's 】ta】gsMClr

brQjNe】w edible in-flight meal t/ray designed for【 plane jo】ur【neysUn4V

HR3NIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsP0Tf

r7wRTe/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placesCCSn

utjgFor many ages, D】anish fishermen have been u\si】ng cl/】inker-built oaken boats, ligh/\】twei/ght and\ flex/ibl】e enough to land directly on 】sand beaches. Thi【s t\raditi】ona】\l 【/wa】y of coastal fishing is considered【 】】more friendly to the marine environment than large-scale \【industri【al me\thods.【But can the boat-b/uilding craft survive the curren【t decli】ne 【of Danis/h\ fishing vi/llages? Fish/ermen and other activists fro】m the Jammerbugt mun【icip\ality of Denmark are \hopi【ng t\o preserve the tradit【ion for at least \anothe\r 100/ years by b\ui\lding 10 new N\ordic 【sea boats for the \young gener/ation of small-scale coastal fishers. Their asso/ciation【, &ldq/uo;Ocean/【 in Balance”, has laun\ched a public cam【paig】n aiming to raise 7/,150,000\ euro【s for th】e boats.【I【n this 360-degree video, Thomas H【øjr【up, the chairman of/ &ldqu\o;Ocean in Balance”, sh\ows us around \a clink】er-built bo\at curren】tly u】n/der cons【truction, exp】laining \the un\ique way the\se boats are de/signed 】and b/ui【lt.【】Journalist name/ • Denis Loc】tierV【i】deo e】d【\it】【or • De\nis 】】LoctierShare this artic/leShare】TweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideSha\reSendSha/reShareShareSendShareSha/reYou\ might al】/so l】ike 】 【 】 \Dan【i/sh fisheries t【ak】】e back 】contro\l 【 】 【 / \ \ 】 How small scal【e fisheries saved Da【nish】 fishi/ng communi【ti【e】s 】 】【 【 \ What’s killing our unde\r】water ecosystems? 【 More abo\ut360° videoFisheryD\e/nmarkEnviron\m\ental protection \ Most 【viewed 】【 】 \ 【 】 】 What 【i//nfluence on climate is the coronav】irus lockdown re】ally having? \ 【 \ / 】 T\he new \AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from】 infection \ / 【【 \Messenger RNA: th【e molecule t\ha】t may 】teach our bodies to b【eat cancer /【】 /【 】 \ \ Apple and Google/ say they【9;ll wo【rk toge】ther to 】trace spread of coron/avirus via smart【phones \ How EU funding i\s c/hanging th\e face/ o【f Latvian\ inn】ov】ation 】 \ Br】owse today�s tag/sVvxW

Cog7Text sizeAa\Aa【A vegan who&rsqu\o】;s passionate about】 zer/o-waste a】n/d/【 minimising the am/ount】 o/f harmful mate\】rials she consumes, such as /pla\stic and palm oil, Shia Su is a force for c【【\hange. Her In【stagram account, @_wastelandreb【e【l_ i/s a one-stop-shop for al】/l th【ings plan【t based, off】ering practical】 tips and useful /tri\cks fo【r making life more sustainable and eco-friend\ly. W【e caugh/t up with 【he\r \t【o find out more a】bout w\here \h【er \p】assion \comes from and w\【ha/t \she hopes t/o a【chieve【 with her inst【agram acc\o\unt.What inspired you \t】o sta】rt your Instagram a/cco【unt【?&/ldquo】;】I have been bloggin【g for eight years. /As a】 blogger, having social m/edia accounts/ lin【ked t【【o the 【bl【og was something \that just made 】se】nse.&rdqu【o;How has your relati【onship with sustainable food evolved ov】e【r 【time?&ldqu【o;I st】arted out as a food blo】gg】er in 2/011, d【eveloping and \sharing r\ecipes for cakes, cook】ie/s, /and desse】\rts. As y【ou can t//ell, \I&【rsquo;】\ve got the\ biggest sweet tooth! However,【 cook\ing has always been more of a necessary evil【 - so/mething an【noy/ing th【at had to be done.【 Unfortunately, even though he finds doing chores ca】l/m/in/g a【nd relaxing,】 my p\artner\ \still【 shares my lack o\f passion for ever【y/\d【ay food 】preparation. However, when we started to\ /reduce /o】ur trash we 【tur【ned to unprocessed】 food \as it is \ea/s/y to buy pack/age【-free. 】We】 were su/ddenly faced wi/th the see】mingly enormou】s task of learnin【g\ how to prepare food&】md】ash;from【 scr\atch!/ It 【was a cha/llenge at firs\/】t】, b/ut one that was wo\rth】 i/t. At the farmers’【 marke【t we】’d ask the farmers how to prepare vegetables【 /that 【we had never seen before. They also told us how\【 th/ey g\rew cert【ain thi】ngs. We have also bee\n able\ to go to farms to see all of it first hand【, so we now hav/e /a ve【ry【 di【fferent apprecia\tion for food.” Voir cette \pu\blication sur I/nstagramU/ne publication partag&eacut】e;e par Shia S【】【u, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd (@_was【tela/ndrebel_【) le 14 /Avril 2019 &a\grave; 9 :07 PDT Voir \cette publication 】sur \In【stagramUn】】】】e publication partagée par Shia Su, Ve\gan【 Zero Wast【e Nerd (\@_wastelandrebe/l_) 【】le 5 Mars 2019 à 11 】:20 PSTHave \y/ou always 【followed a s【ustainable diet?“Not at all! E【verything s\ugar】 was wha【t I was i\nto! And because none of us u【sed t】o enjoy co】oking, we lived /off proces/sed con/venience food a\nd tak\e out】. Thinki\ng bac【k now, I wonder 【how my body man/age】d to handle】 m\e \throwing all that junk \at it&helli【p;&rdqu/o;Ho】w can pe】ople ensur【e the food they bu【y/】 】is sustainably】 】made and sourced?“Download a ca【lendar th/at tells you what /is in sea】son w】here you live. Check it and b】uy at markets i\f you can.】 S\pea\king 【directly to the growers /means you can\ as】k 】th】em how long t】hey 】will 】【still 【be able t\o har/ve/st\ (and sell) this or that, and the【y can give you tips on how/ to f/ermen】t thi【ngs o\r /】ev】en share a quick recipe/】.”“/Some \st\a】ll\s w\ill o】nly/ be rese\lle【rs, b/ut some wil/l\ be th】e 】【farmers the/mselves. Ask t】hem w】here th【eir f】arm\ is and if you/ can /visit. \/Most farmers【 are more than h\appy to welcome】 y】ou - theyalways like it】 when\ people/ show【 genuine 【interest and appre\ciatio】n! Howeve/r, if a farmer /say//s no, \that’s a red fl】ag. What do they have to hide?\ If you see stickers on produc】e w【ith the\ name of another farm, or boxes with\ other name\s, it’s an indicator t\he pro\duce migh/t not be locall\y gro\wn. If【 you ask the farmer and th/e】y deny i\t,【 that’s another red flag. Kee\p in mind these ar】e exceptions.” \Voir cette\ publi【cation sur InstagramUne publication par/tag&\eacute;e【 par Shia Su, Vegan \Zero Waste Nerd (\@/_wast】elandrebe/l_) le 2 Mar/s 2019 à 5 :00 PST Voir cette public\ation sur Ins】ta\gramUne publication part/ag&ea/cut/e\;e 【pa】【r Shia Su, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd (\@_wastelandrebel_) le 21 F&eacu\te;【vr. 2019】 \/\à 6 :51\ PSTWha\t are the biggest problem areas in f】oo【d consumptio【n at the 】mome/nt when it\ come/s t【o sustainabil】ity?“Glob/【ally, abou】t a third of the food we gro\w is wasted. Fo\od has /bec】ome so aff【ordable in p/r【【【oport\ion\ to the income, compared to a f【ew d\e/cades ago. Easy】\ c【\ome, easy \g【o. We have/ also los】t sight of ho】w f】ood is grown and 】s】o m/uch effort goes into this whol\e process, because we can \just go【 to th】e next grocery store to get】 it. 【We also h【ave th【is mindset w\here we want a】ccess to anything anytime.【 We compl/etely disregard\ th\e fact that there are seasons, or that【 som\e】 【fr/uits simply【 do not gr【【ow locally. So our food supply /chai】n now spans across the globe, and our /fo【od travels【 farther than we\ /do【 ourselves. The longer the supply chain, howeve/r, the【 more is 】wasted,\ and the /mo\re packaging is needed to 【pro】tect the c\argo【.\ /T【his me】ans more plastic wa\st】e, too.&r【dquo;How【 w\ould/ you describ【e/ your photography aesthetic? What are y/ou hoping to inspire【?&ldquo\;To be honest, I/ think my photography i\s a bi】t all over the place at the moment. My life has/ been tur【ned ups【ide【 down last year,【】 and my photograp】hy reflects that. Regardless, what \is important to me \is to ad\d value to my followers life. Rig\ht now m【y photos might no\t 】reflect the calm, more minima【list and clean【 a】est\h】etic I’d like them/ 【to, but my posts are full of【 hands-on zero w/as【te tips and infor/mation.”What ti/ps\ can you offer people for r/educing thei】r food wa\s【te?“Buy less】 t】han 】what you fee\l you should buy. We hav【e the tendency 】to b\u【y too much, /encoura\g\ed 】b】y fr/idges【 that could house an\ ele【phant 】and pantries a【 family \c】ould sleep 】in//. If】 you’re the planner type—make a/ meal pl】an, shopping lists, and stick to them!】” Voir cett【e publication sur Instagram\Une pu/blication partag&ea【cute;e par】 S/hia Su, Vegan Zero Wa\s/t/e Nerd (\@【_wa【ste【la\ndrebel_) le 23 \Janv\.\ 2019 à 8 :45 PST Voir cette 】【p【ublication sur InstagramUne publication partag【ée par Shia/ Su, Vegan Zero Wa【ste【 Nerd (@/_was【】telandr】ebe\l_) le 1 Ma/i 20 à 12 :08 PDTWhen did you start working in sus\ta\inable eating and what was th【e 】c】/atalyst fo/r d】oing this?“All the amazing, in\spiring peopl【e I/ ha【ve/ met along the way 【were the ones tha】t kept me /going. Even th【ough I\ disliked cook【ing, talki【ng to\ \the farmers and following many amazin【g sustainable fo【od bloggers like Sara /from @shisodelicio/\u/s or C【】hristi】ne 】from @】co【/n】scious_c【/ooking made me want to try r【ecipes. They spiked my curios/ity for 【food and inspired 【me to venture into/ fermenting. Who wou】ld ha/【v/e thought I【&rsquo【;d】 go】】 f【rom fr【oz/】en【【 p/\izza girl to ferme【ntation-crazed lady?&\rdquo;Can you tell \me a little mor/e about【 your book?&\ldquo;I wro】te this book with t【】he v】oic/e of one my best friends since high school in mind. She is a career woma\n with 【a busy】 schedule a】n\d a/ long com】mute. She always said she’d【 love to have a more s/】us】tainable lif【estyle but /simply lacks the time to do 【the 【research a】nd to DIY \everything. Besides, she prefers to spend】 the little free t】\ime she has with her family and he】r husband】. And I get it—who&rs】quo;s got the time, re【【ally?” Voi/r ce/tte publication sur Instagra/mUne 【publication partagé【e par Shia S\u, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd\ (@_w【【a】stelandrebel_) le 6 Mars 2019 \&】agrave; 2 :45 PST“She wanted a preferably skim-\ab】le gui】de w】ith sim【ple hacks 】that she【 didn’t ha【v【e to/ read 】cove】r to cover. So I\ cam/e up with the /very visual【 beginner-friendly cookbook-lik【\e c/oncept. It【 h【elps you /get int】【o/ the ri【g/ht m】indset and provides background information, much like t\he i】ntroductory 】sec/\tion of\ c\ookbooks explaini】ng the particularities of a c【uisine. There is also a c/hapter on ze\ro waste /helpers s【o you kn【ow wha\t【 e/】quipment will \be h/elpful fo/r your ze【ro waste endeavo】urs. It&rsqu】o;s helpful【】 and very practica】l information, but if you do/n\&rsqu/o;t have t【he e【nergy to 【deal \with it, that’\s fin【e t/oo! Yo/u can ju\st jump to whatev/er 【you feel is man】ag【eable【 for 】you at the mome】nt, o/r whatever you/ feel drawn】 】to w\hen f/lipping thro【ugh】 the pages, a【nd try o【ne or two e\asy swaps or a one-mi【nut【e】【 recipe.&\rdquo;S【hia Su&rsq】uo;s Zero Wa】ste Book is 【out no【w and avai/lable here.Share this article\ More fro】m well/ness1B2i

3WVsText sizeAaAaA\s on【e/ of the o【r\ganisations aiming to】 tackle marine plast/ic pollution, the \S】eychelles Is/l【a【nd Foundation【 has just\ 】released a video 】(click on \the player/ abo】ve) proving that e/ven 【the most remote corners 【o\f the ocean are suffering from the horrors of plastic waste and【 endang/e【red a【nimals. UNES\】CO World He/ritage Sites】 are no exception/. 】It is/ claimed that【 【if the present】 tren/d 】contin/ues, 】oce【ans \could con\tain 】more plastic than fish by 50.\/From bag/s 【to bottles, a/round 13 million tonnes of 【p】lastic flows int\o our oceans eve】ry/ year, acco\rding to a rece/nt UN report. Marine spe/cies ingest or become entangled in plastic de\bris, sometimes cau\s】ing injury or even death. The UN says 100,0/00\ marine animals die each y】ear d\ue to /plastic related causes.On【 many African【 i\slands, /\including the Seychelles, a growing num】/b【er of 【steps】 have bee】n implemented as envi【ro】nm【entalism and tourism ha\ve 】to go hand in hand to protect the /future of th】ese areas.】Click o【n the video【 above to see how】/ \the l\o/cals are abo/ut to s\ave one of the wo/】rld's/ most exclusive \destinations as well as part of 】the /Indian Oc\ean.Share this article】 】 Mo/re from placesxPyE

wK5ZWhat if】\ 】/】we use】d the sea to diver\s/\if//y the stock of a/vailable biofuels?Resear\chers in Aarhus, De\nm【a\rk, are developing a fin【ancially via】ble process that does 】just that/.An ordina\ry ca】r is used to test the seaw【\eed fu【e\l, whi【ch scientists ca//ll a 3rd generation biofuel, and is a sustainable alternative to f/oss\il fuel】s.The tank is filled w】ith 10% seaweed fuel,】 the rest with petrol】 and its performance is compared with gas station fuels."The/ e【missions we 【meas【ure are CO, C【O2, and NOX. And \addi】tionally, we are measuring th/e pa/rticula/te emissi】on】s from th】e car,"/ sa\ys Sten Frand\sen - mechanica/l【 e【ngineer and busin】e【ss【 manage】r at DT】\I."The emission te】sts we got fr】om/ the seaweed】 fuel is on exactly the 【s【ame level /\as wha\t w】e \get from the \r】eferen/ce fuel."Sea【weed biofuel 】does not e/mit less CO2,\/ but \unl/ike \petrol, it extracts CO2 from the a\tmosphere while \gro【wing.\The】 researchers plan t\o \increase 】the portion 】used in the engi】ne tank, convinced that w【e will switch 】to biofuels in 【the upcoming years."We see】 a lot of el\ectrical cars entering the m/】arket, b】ut is that a one fix-all solution for /the CO2/ em【ission【s?" asks\ Frandsen."\Because we have hea【vy-duty tran】/\sport, we have sh】i】ps/ we have aerop/lanes,/ still c】onsuming a large amount of fossil fuels. We \nee】d 】a subst】i/tute for tha】t, and maybe\,【 seaweed co【uld be\/ som/e of the【 soluti【【on【".Why /is seaweed sustainabl\e? 【First, be\caus【e it /grows 】everywhere. It only needs the su\n and the sea,// which covers 70% of ou\r planet】.Its cultivation does not /requir【e any arable 】la\nd, 】fertilizer or freshwater/,/ like othe】r\ biof\u【els made out of/ agricultural \r\esidues for exam\ple.But 】how can 【this new fu\el be produced on an industrial 】s/cale? /This is the ch\allenge of 】a European re】search【 pr】oject c/alled Mac/roF/uels.Scien\【tists at the laboratory【 in P/etten, Nether【lands, 】are /searching f【o】r the best way t\o convert/ seaweed sug\ars to f\ue【ls.In/ some specie/s, this can r/【epres【ent up 【to 60% of\ the plant.【In /the l/】ong term, th/ey woul/d no l\onger】 have to produce bot/tles, /b\ut tons of 】ethanol and butanol barrels.】 S】til\l follo】wing a rat\her basi【c process\:"First /w\/e t】ake s\eawe/ed. And t\hen we use wa/ter to get the suga/rs】 out with some enzymes or acids," says Jaap Van 【Hal, a 【chemist &am\p; i【n\【n\ovation manager at b】iorefin/ery, TNO and macrofuel p/roject scie【ntific coordinat】o】r."\A】nd then you \get a sugar solution, and j/ust like you\ pr【oduce wine or beer, you f\er】ment it to /Ethanol or But\anol, and you blend t/hat with normal ga\soline or d【iesel to pr\oduce E10 \and t/hen you 【drive y/our car \on i】t."More biofuel/ production means more /se/aweed biomass. Th/anks to economies of scale an/d mechaniz/at/ion, res/e\archers\ h/ope to cut the fue\l produc【tio/n costs by 100 per cen】t.T【oget【her with comm【ercializi】ng oth/er】 seaweed 【products【, this could make fuels economically\ feasible in the future."When we started】 the p【roject a couple o\f year/s /ago【/, we were working】 with square meters. Today we are do【in\g hectares, 【and in t【he \near future, we will go in the squar/e kilometre range," says Bert Groenendaal【/, a chemist & R&a/mp;/D project coo/rdinator at】 \】SIOEN.T】o/day】, th\e pr】ice 】of a l\itre【 of seaweed-based biofue\l \is /way to\o high, probably a】 /hundred times more expensi】ve than traditi/o】nal fuels. But when the scale will go up, the p】rice will \g】o down, and we【 will\ get into a ran\ge where we will/ be comp\etitive with tr\aditional /fuels."Based】 on the exa\mple of the w】i【nd secto【r, scientists estimate】 t【hat it will take around 25 \years for the technology to be p\r】ofitable on 【a very large scale.1212Ad【dition\al\ so】urces\ •【 Edi/tor,\ Christele Ben Al\iShare this articleCopy/pas】te\ the /article video embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharese【ndShareTweetSharesendMo】reH\ideShar\eSe/ndShareShareShareSendShareS【h【areYou might also lik】\e \】 Could jellyfis】\【h be the a【nswer to fighting o/cean pol/l\ution? 【 】】 / / / / / Liquid windows and the energy-ef】ficient bu【ildin【gs of tomorrow \ More ab\outCarsFuelResearchEcologyEn【vironm\ental protecti/on/ \ Most viewed 【 What influence on climate is\ t\he corona】virus 】lock/down /really havi】n/g【? 】 / / 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】pr\ema/ture babies \from infe【ction / \ Messen【ge/r RNA: the /molec\ule 【that\ may teach our 】bodie/s to beat cancer 【 / 【 \ 】 \ 】 Apple and Google【 say they&#;ll work togethe】r【 to trace spread of】 coronavirus via /sm】artph】o【nes【 / How EU funding is cha/n【ging the/ f【a【\】ce of Latvi/an innovation 】 / 【 】 Browse】\ to\da【y'】;s tagsxymH

IwOD【/Spar】kle look\s to a gre///ener futu\r\e with the op\ening of its fourth data centre in GreeceHmAu

0GRSH\alf of mille/nni【als would tak\e a pay /c\ut to save the plane\t/ruaK

rWdENe】w edible in-flight meal t/ray designed for【 plane jo】ur【neysM2si

mOi9It【】 sits o\ff the coast of Nor】mandy,【 l【ooking like 】a f\airytale castle flo/ating on】 the water.】But for years, the Mont/ Saint Michel ha】s lost a part of its \mysterious solitude【, due t\o an accumulation of /】silt at the island's base.The concret】e causeway\ that conn\ected the island to the ma【inla】\nd pre\/v/ented the wa\te\】r /from flowly /fre】ely aro【und its base.But, no】w 】the sit】e ha\s begun to reclaim its island-like appearance during cert/a【in high tides.\Research on the proje】c\t start\ed in 1995, an【d continued /for more than/ 10 years.】 It then took another 10 year/s to complete th\e majo/r structural/ changes.\【Mar\ie-Agnés Po\ussi/er-Winsb/ack/, Vice-Presi/dent \of Normandy Regional【 【【Council【, said: "【T/hes\e works had【 two aims. First【ly【, to make sure 】that the island/ /coul/d, once a】gain, b\e what it 【wa【s duri】ng previous 【centuries, that is, surro【】unded by the sea and not s\an【d and silt. And second】ly, 【to\ improve\ the】 way we /ma/nage touri【sm."The \main work undertak】en w】as the remov\al of the\ concr/ete causeway. I/t】 was replaced/ with a brid】ge on stilts, the/refore allowi\ng water【 】to trav【el un】derneath it. It conn\ects to an area of solid gr【/ound that becomes sub/mer\g\ed dur/ing high \tide.Th\e o//ld dam o\n the Co【u/e【snon【 w/\as al【so 【d\emol】i\s【hed, and replaced wi\th /a\ new eig/h【t-gated structure that reg【ulates the 【flow between 】the river 】and the sea, which meet in t/h】e ba/y】.Romai】n D/esgu&e】acute;e, who【】 manages the ne】w d【am, explained to E\urone/ws how it works】."The 】old dam was th\ere to limit floodi\ng 】and mar/ine \flooding. The n】ew dam obvi/ously continues to do so, bu】】t it will regen【erate t/he hydro\logi\cal curren\t in the r【iver to erode the sediment. This will【 rem【ove \the sand t【hat accumulated at the 】base of Mont S】aint M】ichel," \he said.To complete th】is facelift, the car parks at t【he/ foot of the island【 h\ave been\ remo/ved, and it can no/w only be reached by a】 free shuttle bus, horse-drawn/ c【ar【riage, or by foot.More t】han 2.5/ m】illion tourists visit the World He/ritage Site every year, but the】 new 【c【hanges m/【e】an that tou【】r】 guid】es【 have had to adap\t.H【ug】o Poulet, a /gu【ide /】【for Les C】he\min\s de la】 Baie, vis\its the bay【 several 【times a da\y with groups of tourists. He /said that \the structural ch\anges have ha/】】d\ an e【ffect on his wor【k."Since the w\orks hav】e finishe【d, the ground leve】l has drop【ped, 【the sea is moving【 faste\r and no\w 【we \have 】the Cu\esnon pa【ss【ing on 】e/a/\ch side. \We do shorter outing【s, we adapt to\ th【e sea and we manage to 】juggle】\ tha】t,"【 he 【said.The project cost a total of /&【euro;184 mi【llion. Of th】at, €85 million was funded by the Fre\nch government, and €21.5 million was financed by the EU's cohesi】on 【pol/icy,】 w\hich took charge of part of the co/nst\ruction of the dam and its hydraulics.1212121212121212Share this articleCopy/past\e the article video embed l\ink below:CopyShareTweetShare\sendShareTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareSendShareSh/areMore aboutMont-Saint-MichelEnvironmen/tal protectionTou】rismFrance【 \ 【 \Browse today/9;s tagsnurV

Hg9zWhen art/】 is a force for goodsjJJ

QBBiNigerian women revolutionising Fine Art 【WCTn

1.8XRuEnvironmental】【ists' anger after Hung【ary cuts d【own EU-protected for\es\tzk3C

2.ZClnText si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom lifeX3jE

3.AIdTText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from lifeSNCJ

4.zoSvCould jel/ly【fish be th/e answer t】o fighti【ng ocean pollution?QL9z

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QWPNEasyjet a】nnounced that /【from Tuesday it w/ill offset carbon emissions from al/l its flights in a bid\ to become the world's fi/rs【t /carbon-neutr【al airline.The \low-cost British carrier said the move will】 cost the company &\pound;25 million (€29.2 milli】on) in the next financial year.But\ \T】ransport and E】nviron】m【ent (T&am/p;E) warne【d carbo\n offsetting \is unlike【ly to deliver 】the emissions re/ductions prom/i/sed.Ea/syJe\t's 】a【nnouncement comes amid pressure for airlines to tackle t\heir \en【vironmental impact and surpasses/ recent 】com\mitments made\ by rival compa】nies.IAG, the owner of British Airways, said it will, f】\rom nex【t year, offset carbon emissions on domestic】 fli【ghts o【nly \while oth\e/r airli【ne】s inclu】d【ing\ Luftha/nsa and Finnair hav\e 】created programmes】 allowing 【cu【stomers to offset part of th】eir flights.Aviation is one of t/he fastest-growi/ng sources of greenhous【e gas emissions. 】Accordin】g to t】he\ Eur\o【pean Commission, direct e\miss/ions from av【iatio\n account for about】 】3% of the EU's total gr】eenhouse 【gas e】missions and mor【e than【 2】% \of g\lobal emissio//ns. It estimate/s t\【hat\ "if 【glo/\】bal aviation】 was a country, it would ra/nk in 【the top 10 emit\/ters".Re】ad mo【【re:/ 'R【】ya【nair i】s the【 new coal' as/ it becomes the first airline i】n EU's top ten biggest pol【lu/t】ersTo achieve its 【targ/et, EasyJet will i\nvest in afforestation — the planting of new trees — as wel【l/ as in the prod\【u/ction of renewable energies.【It also announced a\ joi/nt electric plan】e developme/n/t projec/t with【 Eu【】r】opean manu/\facturer Airbus and said it will c】onti\nue to suppo/rt t【he Amer\ican start【up/ Wrig】ht Electric【 wh/ich ai】ms to \p】roduce an all/-electric plane."The \cost of your flight will not be impac【te【d by our 】e【fforts t【o red/uce carbon emissi【ons and \neither will the performa】nce of t】he 】plan/e itself or y【ou\r ov\era\ll \safety," it said in a sta】tement.H\owever, the/ Bru\ss\els-based 【\T&/amp;E re/search g】roup, sa【id that "stro\nge】r action by governments to tax the cli\mate impact of flying and develop clean fuels" are needed\ to cut t】he se\ctor'\s emission/s.It stressed that ov【er/ 20 】EU st\ates don'/t 【tax international avia/tion at all and that no memb\er s【tate taxes jet fuel."A【irlines paying【 oth\e【rs so【 that they can go】 on polluting is not a sol\utio\【n to a】v【iation’s cl/imate】\ 】problem. /Decades of airlines&r/squo; unch/eck】ed】 e\missio【ns grow/\th show】s gover\nments need to step up and regu/late aviation&rs【quo;s climate impact b/y endi\ng the secto【r&r【squo;s t/ax privil/eges a\nd mandatin/g clea\n\ fu/els," Andrew】 Mu\】rphy, T&【amp;E'/s aviation manag\】er, said in a statement.Sha【r】e this art】icleCopy/p/aste the arti【cle video embe/【d link below:CopyShare/Tweet\SharesendS\hareTweetSharesend【MoreHideShareSendSha】reShareS】ha/】reS\endShar\eShareYou 【mi】ght al】so like 【 \ Sparkle looks to a greene【r future with the opening of】 its fourth \da\ta centre in Greece 】 // 】 】 】 Good che【/mi【s】try: help\【in\g busi/ness to come within REACH rules/ 】 【 】 【 】 \ / Help\ing Balt】ic/ busine\sses to become c【l/eaner and greener /\ 】 】 \ Mo】【re aboutEnvi\ronmen【tEnviro】nmental protectionAirplan【es\ Browse toda】y'】;s tags0Y1a

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WDZFText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placeseKOG

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9QwS【London's \ne】w natur【e res】erve has as mu【ch biodi\v【ersity as 【a rainforestxEBh

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Nypt\President Donald Trump】 says he has issued a directive to halt U【S pay\ments 【to t\he\ World Health \【O【rganizatio\/n.T】/he funding wi【ll】\ 【cease pending a review of WH/O's \warnings abo\ut/ the coronavirus\ and C/h/i】na.Trump sa/y【s 】the outb】reak could h\av/\e been contained at its sou【r【ce and spared lives had the U\N health a】gency done a better 【job inv/estigatin【g reports comin\g out【 of China.Trump cl【aims th/e organisation failed \to carry】 out its ///&ldquo\/;bas【ic dut/y&r【dquo; and】 must 【be held accountable.Shrinki【n】g of UK economyEarlier o【n【 Tuesday th/e UK's /tax and spending watchdog/ has s/aid the British econ【o\my \cou【ld shrink\ by 】a record 35 percent】 by June. The bl】eak report come【s fro【m the\ Office for Budget Respo】nsibil/ity.Com/menting【 on the g【\overnment's resp\onse /to the crisis, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak sa\id the measures p】u【t/ i\n p\lace w/ere the \"right p/lan".View his news conference in the video p/l/【ayer aboveOffi】ci【al statistics on Tuesday showed t\/hat hun【dred】s of deaths in British car【e homes have not been in】cluded i【n】 govern【【ment f】igures -- which only /take\ account of death/s in hospita\ls. I】【t【 has led to crit/ic/ism that the eld/erly ar\【e being "airb\rushe】d \/ou】t".Sunak insist【ed that the country's【 battle against coronavi/rus was "n\ot a\ choice between health 【and economics". Other 【key \developments:The/ Internationa/l Mone】tary Fund (IMF) sai】d in its】 latest forecast t/hat the w【orld econo\my would suffer its worst year since the Grea\t Depression of the 1930s \-- and shrink by thre/e percent in/ 20/20.US Presiden】t Donald 【Trump has defende/d his administra/tion's handling 【of the【 pan【demic】, saying he has "to】ta【l power" t\o li】ft the lockdown\ if need be.France\ /and India hav\e jo/ined Italy in/ extending their nationwide lockdowns to stem the spread of the deadly 【nove\l coronav【irus】.These decisi【ons come as the/ number of infec\tions【 worldwide near the two mi/llion threshold. Nearly 120,000 people have【 now lost 【/th\eir lives 】to COVI/D-1/9】.】Foll\o】w all the latest updatesShare thi/s articleCopy/paste the a\rticle【 vid】eo embed \lin/k below:Copy】ShareTweetS】h【aresendShareTweetS/ha【res【endMo/reHi\de\ShareSendShareShareShareSe【ndShar/eSh\a/reYou might also like / / / Rising populism sto【kes disco\ntent but offers f\ew solutions to】 global thre【ats like COV\ID-1【9 ǀ View 】 【 【 / \ C/ould a ce】ntury-old met/hod 】help treat COVID-】【1 pa】tients? 【 】 \ \ \ \ 】 / How to s】tay healthy\ working from h】【ome, according to chiropractor\s\ 】 【 More aboutC】O】VID【-1CoronavirusEuro【pean Un\ionHot Topi】cLea/rn more about / Coronavir\u\s Hot TopicLearn more about 【 Coronavirus \ Brow/se【 tod】ay】9;s tags6RpC

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DpbXWhat is/ enviro】nment【al crime 】a【nd sho\uld /you re\p\ort it?【/ 【X2v0

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xBRfTex/t sizeAaAaOn【e in four workers】 would take a pay cut to /do/ w】ork that&rsquo\;s bett】er \fo】r the envir/onment, a】ccor/din】g to new【 re【search 【by【/ careers sit【e Totaljobs. That figu/re rises t【o half among millennials, aged\ 23-38.】Al\so known as Generation Z, mi【llennials told res】earchers they’】d be wi【lling t【o /drop &pou\nd;11,0 from their 【salaries o】n average【. That compare\s to £3,800 \Genera【tion X respond】ents【 aged b】etween 39-54 said they’d be willing/ to forgo for a g/reener j】ob role.In the UK, the\ surv【ey found 60% of j【obs】eekers resear\ched a potent/ial\ employe】r’/s sustainabilit\y and 】environme】nt cr\edentia/ls before/ accepting a positio】n. M\eanwhile, \f\our in every five empl【oyees【\ though\t comp\anies had/ a re【spons【ibility to lo\o/k after /the【 environment,【 with thre【e\ in【 f】ive agreeing their employers should be /【do】ing more.Read more | Noughti\e/s\ rap legend Akon to build gre/en cityA\roun/d th/e same amou/nt were\ willing to accept cuts in sp】【ending on activitie\s like team lunche\s, furniture an【d events.Environment\ attitudes inspi/red by David Att】enb/orough an\d Greta ThunbergSome 18% of wo【rkers/ in g\en/eral an/d 34% mi/llennial【s reported\ that they \would refu/se t【o work for a company 】they thought wa\s har】ming the natural world. The majority said they w】ere m/ore interest【ed in cl\imate issues】\【 than t】\hey wer\e five years ag\o, sayi【n/g a hig/her profi【le【 in the\ /media ha\d drawn【 their attenti【on.Greta Th\unberg】 arrives \in Spain for】 COP 25Copyrigh\t 2019 \The Associated Press.】 All r/ights reservedPedr【o RochaT\he influen【ce of n/at\ural】ist a\nd broadcaster Sir【 David Attenb【orough and young ac【tiv】ist G【reta Th/unberg were 】also cited as key drive/rs for pe】opl【e to\ cut their carbon footprint.“It has ne\ver bee【n more \i/mportant f/\or busi【nesses to be 【par\t of th】e solution to 【our pl】anetary /c【rises,” said Gudrun \C/artwright, envi【ronment d\irector 】at Bus】iness i【n the Community.【&ldquo/;Young people are no 】long】er begging leaders 】to 】change but tell】ing them /that cha/nge is comi\ng re\gardles【s. Businesses that i】gno】re\ it /face an imminent\ exis\te】ntial threat. Our futures depend on \rapid,【 】ambit/ious action, and we can all make a differen【ce.”Sh【are this article More from li\fecIBR

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yX7WText /s【izeAaAaF【\r/om climat\e change to deforestation,pollution/to t\heloss\ of biodiversit\y, the biggest threats 【to the environment come with a growing awareness and a new willingness to embrace 】moreeco-friendly solutions. 【We】 collected five inspiring examples from around the world.One of th\e\ 】】things that got scie】ntis【ts worried is that/ swarms /of summer bugs seem to be a thing\ of 【】the past. In /the US【, ma/ny states are trying to /stop thei】r /decline. Maryl】】and\ came u/p wit【/】】h an id\ea whic【h already \proved itself, howev】e【r, for\ s【o\me\,\ it might seem to /be contr\o\versial.Another good \examp【le is the tin【y Greek island of T/il【os, which i/s soon to go completely off-grid as i/t benefits 【from the joint \initiative of t/he U/ni【ve/rsity /of\ Ea/st Anglia and the Unive/rsity o/f Applied \Sciences in Pira【eus. T【ilos\ i/s known as 】a green isl/and, pop\ular】 with hik【ers and 【bir【dwatchers, an【d most of the island \is now a protect】ed nature reserve.London is 【an es】peci\ally inspir/ing place fo\r those 【appl【ying eco-fr【ien\】dly solutio\ns, such as this】 classy【 hotel in th【//e heart 【of London, which has created a /natural 】【habitat/【 for wildlife,】】 or this s/tart-up coming up w【ith what's claimed to be 】the wor\l【d's first intelligent【 biological ai】r filter.2018 has\ seen【 some great ad【van【ces in green technology, click 【on \t】he v】i/d/】eo t/o learn mo】re about our selec\ti【on.Share this a\rticle More f\ro】m p【lacesHl6j

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